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David Temby - Temby Australia added 2 new photos.

There's always something that were are working on - at last, our custom valve section made especially for us in Germany has arrived. With MAW valves, nickel silver slide outers, and a variety of 12 interchangeable bottom caps (29gram solid and longer hollow, not mega heavy caps). Next up is forming the main tuning slide, fitting the bell, making braces and other fittings, fitting the lead pipe and receiver, water keys, and finger rings. Going to need a bunch of weeks of concentration to finish this one.

But at least - the next generation of very serious horns has started!
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Tristan Diego Rogers, Daimon Brunton and 7 others like this

Gianni MarinucciCan't wait to try it Dave!!!

5 hours ago
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Donald MayneMmmmmmm where is my finances

5 hours ago   ·  1
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Iain MclachlanI'm liking the sound of this already :)

5 hours ago   ·  1
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Temby trumpet artist Darrel Medeiros has played with Gloria Estefan, Harry Connick Jr., Doc Severinsen, Maynard Ferguson, Manhattan Transfer, The Stylistics, Marty Allen, Glenn Miller Orchestra, Tex Benekie, Nelson Riddle Orchestra, Bobby Caldwell, All Star Chicago Jazz Orchestra, Julie Andrews, The musicals CATS, Victor-Victoria, Man of La Mancha, Columbia pictures…Zoot Suit movie and Hollywood tour, and many more. His fans extend to non humans also (although you may be mistaken that his pal here is more than human) ... See MoreSee Less

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My own Selmer Piccolo from 1974. Here's some fun on a 15th birthday. Felix is a talented and passionate trumpet player, who is first chair trumpet man at one of Melbourne's leading music schools (and a great young Temby Trumpet ambassador). He's going to have a treat for a few weeks or months, playing my own Selmer Paris picc from 1974.

This horn has a really crazy history. It goes something like this: I was at Melbourne Conservatorium at that time, and was desperate to play something different to the standard Bb horns. I don't think at the time that there were any other picc players at the Con, but others that were also studying around that time may shed better light on this - Rob Sims, Paul Plunkett, Robert Harry and other students of Merv Simpson, John Schmidli and Lance Black (the MSO trumpet section). I found two brand new Selmer Piccs at Legato, who at that time were the "go to" place for serious horns. After hours of playing both, I settled on a horn that was going to take a pretty big place in my heart. I was teaching at Yarra Valley Grammar and Ivanhoe Girls Grammar at the time, so I was able to fund this major purchase (just).

For the next couple of years, the picc played millions of fun notes, and surprisingly, it's favourite outings were soloing over the top of "Tramm" a hugely successful and popular band. 3 male and 3 female singers, Chicago/BST style horn section, awesome rhythm section and heaps and heaps of work. Those were the days when a 5 hour gig was normal - huge functions like Miss Victoria, Miss Australia gala nights, Yooralla balls and telethons on GTV9, opening events for new mega shopping centres, and the list went on and on. Imagine picc solos front of stage over KC and The Sunshine Band, Chicago and other band's songs - crazy but fun! I have to say though that without mics on the horns, and such long and demanding gigs, embouchure support structures sometimes suffered constant abuse, and without sufficient repair time in between gigs.

This encouraged me to study and understand as much about physiology and anatomy relating to wind instrument players as I could. This understanding has subsequently been a vital ingredient in helping other players to develop stamina, chose the right mouthpiece as an interface between the player's body and the idiosyncrasies of their instrument's airflow, reactivity and resistance, and in working on trumpet, saxophone and flute designs for manufacture.

For one of the GTV9 telethons, I wrote and recorded at TCS with Tramm, a chart of "He ain't heavy, he's my brother". The sound of my straight (bell to front like flugel, but in F) Mellophone and Selmer Picc over Ian Godfrey's (now Melb Uni) tenor sax and Scott Matthew's trombone, was one that I will always remember as being very special. Incidentally, here's some more names from those days - David Rouch guitar, Doug Kuhn bass, Mick Carranza trombone (tragically killed in South America in 1975 and replaced by Scott Matthews who later became an airline pilot) Chris Edsall drums, Myself on trumpet and keys, Ian Godfrey sax, and vocals headed up by Peter Watsford, Steve, Frank and the girls.

In 1976, I decided that I wanted a break from playing and teaching, and started pursuing another full time career, leaving music as a part time endeavour, so like many have done before, and after me, I decided to sell an instrument that had a huge place in my heart.

Lance Black (MSO) had a student that was really keen on buying it, so off it went to a new owner. It's weird when you do this sort of thing, it doesnt take too long before you question your decision, and then it eats away at you forever (just like if I could ever find my Olds Recording Bb that I played through 1973 - 1978. I needed a trombone and trumpet in 1998, and thought it best to trade the Olds for a Conn Director trumpet and trombone pair. Big mistake you may all say! Anyway, 2 months later, I re-traded these for an 88H and was in trombone heaven for the next bunch of years.

If I could ever find that Olds again that I purchased in March 1974 (traded in my 1950's Connstellation) , I would pay just about anything to get it back - I cut the top part of the inside flap of the case out, and made this fabric into a shape to hold my piccolo in the mute section of the case. If anyone ever sees this weird case, I guess that's my treasured Bb.

Anyway a bunch of years ago, I saw a sales ad in the "Trading Post" for a Selmer Piccolo. I phoned the seller and asked if he had bought it through Lance Black, and with an affirmative answer, was in my car and at his house with a wad of cash, faster than a blink! How exciting - I had my picc back and it was just as I remembered. He had looked after it beautifully - the old "used but not abused" trick!

About 5, 6 or 7 years ago I loaned it out to an orchestral player, and thought that it had never been returned. I was wrong. It turned out that I had subsequently load it to another friend for some show work, but I had totally forgotten about that. So for another few years, I was upset that I had lost my picc again, until borrower number 2, phoned a year or so ago and he said he had a Selmer picc in his possession and wondered if I knew who it belonged to. Sheer Joy is an understatement!!!!

So the journey of the renegade picc continues today - I disassembled it earlier this week, gave it an ultrasonic clean, refitted all the slides and valves to perfection, and now, one of my favourite young Temby pro trumpet players, can enjoy the thrill of playing Maurice André's design work with Selmer Paris from the late 1960's - early 1970's. He will find that the slots on these horns are quite wide, but when you are in the centre, it tells you you are working together nicely.

Enjoy Felix! I look forward to hearing you play this horn soon!
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Iain Mclachlan, Darrel Medeiros and 12 others like this

David RouchI remember that solo of "He ain't Heavy." Great story about the horn.

2 days ago
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Clarissa FlockartLooking good Felix

2 days ago   ·  1
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Head of Box Hill Institute - Music Degrees, Tim Weir plays a Temby prototype lead horn at Dizzy's Jazz Club late last year. "I liked a lot about the horn and think there's some great stuff already in there. It will be really cool to see where this one ends up! I'd love another chance to play on it," This horn is now ready for sale $2900 (plus MAW valves if you want to free up the blow even more, and have even better connectivity between notes). Test play at The Music Place Sth Melbourne, or contact me on 1300 729899 to organise a test play. Cheers, David ... See MoreSee Less

Winter 2015, In the beautiful St Paul's Cathedral, Melbourne Australia, Adam Simmons - Inderbinen Soprano Saxophone & Nick Tsiavos - Double Bass play excerpts from their wonderful new album - Sixteen Alleluias, available at fatrain.bandcamp.com/album/sixteen-alleluias.

"It was an enormous pleasure and honour to hear and feel the beautifully raw, serene, respectful, poignant and tonally adventurous performance of these extraordinary works, by an equally extraordinary pair of musicians that have such a closeness of musical connectivity. What a fabulous experience thank you Adam and Nick" David Temby - Temby Australia, Partner of Inderbinen Handmade Musical Instruments Switzerland/Australia www.temby.com


Alleluia.

An ancient word, it has moved beyond its original liturgical usage to one that has a web of meanings woven through it. It encompasses the light of joy and elation. It never fails as a succinct and useful form of punctuation. And as we fall into the depths, seeking hope against the dark in a final resigned acceptance of all that will come to pass, the word hovers close in our consciousness.

Adam and I have been working together in various situations the past ten years, mainly in my 'Liminal' quintet and its larger manifestations, yet we were eager to explore what was possible in a distilled form of the work we have collaborated on - just Adam and his soprano sax, and me with my bass. An opportunity arose in late 2014 when the Art Gallery of Ballarat invited the two of us to perform at 'EIKON', their exhibition of Byzantine Iconography. I suggested we explore a collection of Alleluias in their proper and plagal forms, as an entry point into our idea of developing a performing duo, and this is the result.

Nick Tsiavos
credits
released 01 June 2015
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David Temby - Temby Australia added 5 new photos.

Lots more Backun clarinets, barrels, bells & mouthpieces just arrived. Every model is available right now through The Music Place ... Sth Melbourne & Annandale, and Barratts Music... Launceston! For other states, contact me and I will make sure that you can experience these most beautiful clarinets and accessories ever!
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Labh Singh, Paris Lochrin and 23 others like this

Alex HutchinsonI think that Maurie Backuns greatest "asset " is Eddie Daniels, for obvious reasons.

3 weeks ago
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Felicia ShaddickWilliam Thomas BAKUNNNN

3 weeks ago
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Test driving Inderbinen trumpets and flugelhorns and Temby hand assembled trumpets ... Downstairs @ The Music Place, Annandale in June. Great playing from Simon Ferenci, Eamon Dilworth, Will Gilbert & Danny Carmichael on horns with the brilliant rhythm section of Matt McMahon, Andy Gander and Steve Hunter. Thanks guys! ... it was an awesome night! ... See MoreSee Less

David Scott Temby, Darrel Medeiros and 9 others like this

David Temby - Temby AustraliaAnd Fin McAvoy was ripping out great notes also, but unfortunately, we missed videoing him. Apologies Fin, but thanks for being involved!!!!!

3 weeks ago
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David Temby - Temby Australiayes, we missed you Darrel. Thanks as always for your incredible support and wonderful comments about my horns - very much appreciated - especially from a man who has certainly got an enviable musical resume.!

3 weeks ago
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David Scott TembyHey David! Gimme my name back! Just watched that video. Very nice! Kudos David of Australia!!

3 weeks ago
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Darrel MedeirosSWEEEEEEET! I wished I was there! Jamming good!

3 weeks ago
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